Corticosteroid cream potency

Like other topical corticosteroids, hydrocortisone valerate has anti-inflammatory, antipruritic and vasoconstrictive properties. The mechanism of the anti-inflammatory activity of the topical steroids, in general, is unclear. However, corticosteroids are thought to act by the induction of phospholipase A 2 inhibitory proteins , collectively called lipocortins. It is postulated that these proteins control the biosynthesis of potent mediators of inflammation such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes by inhibiting the release of their common precursor arachidonic acid. Arachidonic acid is released from membrane phospholipids by phospholipase A 2 .

Even though topical corticosteroids such as creams or ointments are applied to the surface of the skin, they can still cause side effects . Long-term use or excessive use can lead to thinning of the skin, irritation, dryness, or changes in skin color. If your doctor recommends that you occlude your psoriasis areas -- wrapping them in plastic after applying a topical corticosteroid to boost the effect -- side effects may be more common. More serious side effects may occur with topical corticosteroids if used in high doses for prolonged periods. You may become resistant to the helpful effects of topical corticosteroids over time, too.

It is important to use the correct amount of topical steroid for your eczema, as instructed by your healthcare professional. Topical steroids should be applied with clean hands so that the skin just glistens. It can sometimes be difficult to judge how much steroid to use and there are guidelines on the amount required to cover body areas that are affected by eczema. These are based on the Finger Tip Unit (FTU), and explained in detail in our fact sheet which you can download as a pdf from the related documents to the right of this page.

  • This cream is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes, the mouth, or intravaginally.
  • Patients under the age of 17 years, in diaper dermatitis and under occlusion.
  • Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia and glucosuria in some patients.
  • Conditions which augment systemic absorption include use over large surface areas, prolonged use and use under occlusive dressings.
  • Patients applying cream to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression.
  • If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid.
  • Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids.
  • The use of gentamicin may result in overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms including fungi. If superinfection occurs during gentamicin therapy, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.
  • Cross allergenicity among aminoglycosides has been demonstrated.
  • The possibility of cumulative toxicity should be considered if gentamicin is applied topically to large skin lesions or large areas of denuded skin in combination with systemic aminoglycoside therapy.
  • Pregnancy: There are no adequate and well controlled studies of the teratogenic potential of topically applied corticosteroids in pregnant women. Therefore topical steroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus. The drug should not be used on extensive areas, in large amounts or for prolonged periods in pregnant women.
  • Lactation: Since it is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids can result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk, a decision should be made to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Effects on ability to drive and use machines: None stated.

     

Corticosteroid cream potency

corticosteroid cream potency

  • This cream is for external use only. Avoid contact with the eyes, the mouth, or intravaginally.
  • Patients under the age of 17 years, in diaper dermatitis and under occlusion.
  • Systemic absorption of topical corticosteroids has produced reversible hypothalamic - pituitary - adrenal (HPA) axis suppression, manifestations of Cushing's syndrome, hyperglycemia and glucosuria in some patients.
  • Conditions which augment systemic absorption include use over large surface areas, prolonged use and use under occlusive dressings.
  • Patients applying cream to a large surface area or to areas under occlusion should be evaluated periodically for evidence of HPA axis suppression.
  • If HPA axis suppression is noted, an attempt should be made to withdraw the drug, to reduce the frequency of application, or to substitute a less potent corticosteroid.
  • Recovery of HPA axis function is generally prompt upon discontinuation of topical corticosteroids.
  • The use of gentamicin may result in overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms including fungi. If superinfection occurs during gentamicin therapy, the drug should be discontinued and appropriate therapy instituted.
  • Cross allergenicity among aminoglycosides has been demonstrated.
  • The possibility of cumulative toxicity should be considered if gentamicin is applied topically to large skin lesions or large areas of denuded skin in combination with systemic aminoglycoside therapy.
  • Pregnancy: There are no adequate and well controlled studies of the teratogenic potential of topically applied corticosteroids in pregnant women. Therefore topical steroids should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the foetus. The drug should not be used on extensive areas, in large amounts or for prolonged periods in pregnant women.
  • Lactation: Since it is not known whether topical administration of corticosteroids can result in sufficient systemic absorption to produce detectable quantities in breast milk, a decision should be made to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the importance of the drug to the mother.
  • Effects on ability to drive and use machines: None stated.

     

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