East german zigzag brake

So,
initially in Nth Africa {that insignia}, relocating to Germany?
I see the slats mentioned, but was expecting caption to go on as to why I was checking them out.
Some kind of leading-edge Flap-function? or lift-busting type air-brake for landing?
or was there a radiator in behind there?
I read {Galland} that the gondola-mounts were unpopular – {levelflight/climbing airspeed loss}.
I also thought all the 109’s were essentially cannon-equipped, as they carried that heavy calibre example firing through the prop spinner?
From Galland’s book I couldn’t figure out why the “bathtubs” were used, when cannon were sqeazed into very thin luftwaffe wing dimensions – I’m guessing to carry excessive ammunition before tipping air-superiority conditions brought flight capabilities to a state of higher priority?
It is always striking to read these firsthand accounts of these events.

Modern day sleighs combine light metals, steel runners, and an aerodynamic composite body. Competition sleighs must be a maximum of metres ( ft) long (4-crew) or metres ( ft) long (2-crew). The runners on both are set at metres ( ft) gauge . Until the weight-limit rule was added in 1952, bobsleigh crews tended to be very heavy to ensure the greatest possible speed. Now, the maximum weight , including crew, is 630 kilograms (1,390 lb) (4-man), 390 kilograms (860 lb) (2-man), or 340 kilograms (750 lb) (2-woman), which can be reached via the addition of metal weights. The bobsleighs themselves are designed to be as light as possible to allow dynamic positioning of mass through the turns of the bobsleigh course. [4]

East german zigzag brake

east german zigzag brake

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east german zigzag brake