Steroid nasal spray and blood pressure

Sixty children were recruited in a 2-stage, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. All patients complained of chronic nasal obstruction symptoms, and nasal endoscopy showed >75% choanal obstruction attributable to adenoid pads. In the first stage, 30 patients (group A) underwent mometasone treatment (50 microg per nostril per day) for 40 days, and 30 children (group B) received placebo. In the second stage, at the end of the first 40-day treatment period, patients in group A who showed subjective and objective clinical improvement were divided into 2 subgroups; group A1 (11 children) received topical intranasal steroid treatment on alternate days for the first 2 weeks per month, whereas group A2 (10 children) continued daily mometasone treatment for the first 2 weeks per month. After 3 months, all children were reassessed.

A second study assessed adrenal response to mometasone furoate nasal spray, 50 mcg (400 and 1600 mcg/day), prednisone (10 mg/day), and placebo, administered for 29 days in 48 male volunteers (21 to 40 years of age). The 24-hour plasma cortisol area under the curve (AUC 0-24 ), during and after an 8-hour Cortrosyn infusion and 24-hour urinary free cortisol levels were determined at baseline and after 29 days of treatment. No statistically significant differences in adrenal function were observed with mometasone furoate nasal spray, 50 mcg compared to placebo.

Steroid nasal spray and blood pressure

steroid nasal spray and blood pressure

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steroid nasal spray and blood pressuresteroid nasal spray and blood pressuresteroid nasal spray and blood pressuresteroid nasal spray and blood pressuresteroid nasal spray and blood pressure